The Great Bangalore Tin Factory Junction Traffic Jam

A view of the omnipresent traffic jam at the infamous Tin Factory junction neat KR Puram Railway station in Bangalore, the bane of Bangalore commuters. This photo shows only the traffic coming in from the railway station side along a essentially three-lane road that is mostly always filled with traffic, just as on the other side which is perennially congested. You can see people trying to cross the roads in between, literally putting their lives on the line. The place is horribly dusty and polluted as you can see, look at the sky – those are not rain clouds but smog from vehicle exhaust, seen against the “hanging bridge”, a planning disaster as is most of the remaining of Bangalore. And of course, this is far from the worst, actually this traffic is less.

The New Krishnarajapuram (KR Puram) Railway Station Building

The new Krishnarajapuram (KR Puram) railway station building entrance on Platform 4 facing the Ring Road,  a bit before the current “entrance” at the junction under the hanging bridge. Very discreetly SWR constructed this in a time span of 6 months, and will be the official main entrance to the station from now on. As of now the official station building is on the other side on PF1 facing a narrow and crowded street. KJM was once a quaint little station on the outskirts of the city where only a few passenger trains stopped, but with the growth of the city and the construction of the outer ring road, it is now a major railway station very much inside the city and one of its gateways where all trains stop and thousands of people pass through everyday, making the KR Puram Railway Station junction a notoriously massive traffic bottleneck, probably the biggest in the city. However, there is no parking space here nor space for autos and pedestrians and the approach road is too narrow! I hope they will solve all these problems. The current “entrance” at the ring road junction will will hopefully be closed once this is officially opened. Here is the location.

The Brindavan Express Snakes Towards KR Puram

The legendary 12640 Brindavan Express from Bangalore City to Chennai Central headed by a RPM WAP7 snakes its way slowly towards Krishnarajapuram Railway Station in Bangalore. The train is very long as it can be seen in this photo. It started running in 1964 is today just a shadow of its former glory. It does not even have an AC Car Car coach, slaughtered at the altar of the double decker. The weed-filled lake and the so-called KR Puram “hanging bridge” can also be seen.

Two of India’s Old Electric Warhorses!

Two old electric warhorses of the Indian Railways coupled together (MU-ed) wait their turn to carry on with their duties at KR Puram Railway Station, Bangalore. Battered and bruised from their long years of hauling heavy freights across the country, the WAG5A #23129 and WAG5 #23083 locomotives (engines) both belong to the Arakkonam (AJJ) electric loco shed today. Note their old Maroon livery, which was the color of all trains in India until 1996. Maroon color is usually used to denote vaccum-braked rakes, though these two are air-braked. Only the 23083 is live, the other one is switched off, panto down.

The 4360 hp engined dedicated freight hauling WAG5s and variants revolutionized electric traction in Indian Railways and were the ones which put India on electric wheels. They are the most successful electric locomotives in India, with 1200 of them produced since they were introduced in 1988, and most are still going strong!

KR Puram Tin Factory Junction “Aerial” View

An “aerial” view of the KR Puram TIn Factory Bus Stop from the foot over bridge. Seven Roads converge at this junction and is a location of perpetual chaos. On a cloudy afternoon. The pillars of the famous KR Puram “hanging bridge” (cable stayed) can be seen in the distance.

LHB Rakes for the Bangalore Rajdhani!

Brand new Alstom LHB coaches of the Nizamuddin – Bangalore Rajdhani Express sits at KR Puram railway station. This was before commissioning, the rakes were awaiting clearance certificate. LHB coaches are based on Aluminium and are faster, more durable and lighter. All Rajdhanis and Shatabdis in India run on LHB rakes today.