At the Top of the Jebel Hafeet Mountain, Al Ain, UAE by Night

The night view from the observation deck at the Jebel Hafeet mountain near Al-Ain in Eastern UAE on the border with Oman. The place is one of the favorite getaways for people from all over the southern Gulf region. Sadly, the top of the mountain is nothing but a large parking area filled with cars all the time. The surroundings and everything else looks yellow because the entire area is lit by yellow sodium vapor lamps. It would be awesome if these were to be replaced by daylight fluorescent lamps, as it would bring out the various colors of the rocks ranging from white to sand to yellow to orange to red. This is a long exposure photo, light trains of cars can also be seen.

A Lovely Kuttanad Evening in a Typical Kerala Backwater Setting

Kuttanad, that part of Kerala in Alappuzha (Alleppy) world-famous for its backwaters. This is the “backbone” of those backwaters, the Pampa river lazily cutting though its center at Chennemkari in a typical Kerala backwater setting: A wide expanse of clear water flanked by palm-tree fringed banks, reflecting off the lazily flowing water. Taken at water level from a small “shuttle” boat used to cross the river by the local people. Two houseboats can be seen in the distance.

A Sunset Lights Up an Incredible Raining Cloud Bank in a Golden Hue!

The setting sun lights up an incredibly wide, expansive cloud bank, all cottony and fluffy from “behind”, highlighting it contours in a poetic golden hue late one evening. One set of raining clouds in the middle is completely lit up in the golden setting color of the sun! The rain falling of the cloud can be clearly seen as golden showers (not the kind you are thinking of, hehe). The size of the cloud banks can be judged by the coconut trees in the bottom right corner. Taken from a train at dusk near Velloor, Kottayam district, Kerala.

A Photograph of Rain. That Looks Like a Painting.

Rain falls in sheets during the Kerala monsoon and all the flora around: the baby mango tree on the left side with its leaves glistening with rain water, the something tree on the right and the jackfruit and coconut trees in the background, all are only too happy about it! 🙂 This photograph was taken in HDR mode and you can clearly see the streaks of rain drops falling! Doesn’t it look like a painting? I think it does 🙂

The Full-Flowing Bharathapuzha River During the Monsoon

The Bharathapuzha river, the longest flowing river in Kerala flows (almost) to the brim all muddy and swirling amidst heavy rains during the Monsoons in June 2015. The river, known poetically as the Nila in Malayalam, has shaped the culture and ways of life of Valluvanadu (southern Malabar). But the Nila is in dire straits today, victim of human greed. Indiscriminate sand mining has eroded the river and is killing it. What looks like a patch of grass in the middle is actually a mini forest-sized group of tall shrubs growing on an embankment in the middle of the river, showing how much the river has been mauled and raped to satisfy the need for human “development”. However, nature stuck back and has leveled it once again! Taken from the Shoranur railway bridge.

Green Fields and Blue Skies – The Typical Rural Kerala Setting

Big blue skies, green waterlogged fields, and a canal ringed by green trees on the horizon, bisected by a road running through the field. The typical rural Kerala setting. The incredible blueness of the skies that day was especially mind blowing! The now waterlogged paddy fields are being used by people to rear ducks during the monsoon. Not mentioning what place this this, as it would do good not to be besieged by tourists. Though some people might recognize this. Hint: A famous engineering college in Kottayam district.